Prom. Promposal. Prom Queen. Post Prom. Yikes, I don’t remember it all being so over the top! Prom is the premier event every spring that teens around America think will change their lives. It doesn’t, but what if it did? The following reading list is for you if you enjoy your prom stories with drama, blood and gore, or just plain old disaster. All books reviewed are available at your Kenosha Public Library.

“Carrie” by Stephen King

After a young woman is humiliated at the prom, she inflicts her revenge. Published in 1974, this was King’s first full-length published novel, though it is rather short by King standards. Carrie remains a psychological thriller that is just as relevant in 2018 as it was in 1974. This is the terrifying prom book that started them all. Carrie has remained in print for over 40 years and has also been released in multiple film versions and a Broadway show.

“Prom Nights From Hell: An Anthology of Short Stories” (Cabot, Harrison, Jaffe, Meyer, Myracle)

Five best selling and well respected young adult authors take on the prom! These quick and easy reads take bad prom nights to a whole new level — a paranormal bad level. Wardrobe malfunctions and two left feet don’t hold a candle to discovering your date is the Grim Reaper — and he isn’t here to tell you how hot you look.

From angels fighting demons to a creepy take on getting what you wish for, these five stories will entertain better than any DJ in a bad tux. No corsage or limo rental necessary. Just good, scary fun.

“Written in the Stars” by Aisha Saeed

A teenage girl of Pakistani-American heritage defies her parents by going to the prom and, gasp, falling in love. Thus starts the suspenseful domino effect of actions taken by conservative immigrant parents that leaves Naila powerless and cut off from everyone she loves. She has a harrowing realization that everything has changed and she needs to find a compromise with her parents or her own dreams for her future will die in an instant.

This is an important, paging turning story that explores love, family, culture and freedoms. The author, Aisha Saeed, is a Pakistani-American writer, teacher and attorney. Her writings have appeared in publications including The Orlando Sentinel, Muslim Girl magazine and BlogHer. As one of the founding members of the much talked about We Need Diverse Books campaign, she is helping to change the conversation about diversity in literature.

Off the Shelves is published Sundays. Each week a different Kenosha Public Library or Community Library staff member organizes reviews of a handful of books available through the library system.

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