{{featured_button_text}}

Dr. David Curry is a “minimally invasive image-guided proceduralist,” also known as a physician who practices interventional radiology.

The specialty involves using images — ultrasound, CT and fluoroscopy (a moving X-ray) — to guide a physician in the repair and treatment of a number of different medical conditions.

“The images steer us so we can see where we want to go,” Curry said.

Because it can be used throughout the body, the field of interventional radiology is very broad, Curry said. “We interact with many different specialties, entities, diseases, problems. We do some of the same procedures that surgeons do but we do it in a different way.”

Vertebroplasty, the procedure Curry used to repair a bone in the spine of Bob Nelson, is one of those specialties. Other interventional radiology applications include biopsies, drainage procedures, stents and several vascular procedures.

The treatment of these medical conditions takes place using minimally invasive incisions. “It’s like building a ship in a bottle,” Curry said.

When he arrived at Froedtert South in May of this year, Curry was the first interventional radiologist that Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin St. Catherine’s Medical Center and Kenosha Medical Center had had in a while.

To bring current staff up to speed, he walks them through what he is doing during procedures. “My challenge is getting the medical staff to know what interventional radiology is,” Curry said.

Because of the wide range of applications for which interventional radiology is used, Curry considers himself, medically speaking, a bit of a jack of all trades.

“I describe myself as a handyman who comes to your house and can do a little plumbing, a little electric, a little carpentry,” he said. “I do the human version of that on your body: a little on your joints, your liver, your kidneys, your spine. I’m like the medical version of a handyman.”

0
0
0
0
0