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POULTNEY, Vt. — A college student in Vermont is living in a 96-square-foot house he built to reduce his carbon footprint — and save money.

Green Mountain College senior Rob Dunn has been living in the two-story Poultney home since August 2014.

The home is powered by two 100-watt solar panels. A rocket mass heater built from a cast-iron stove insulated with a mixture of clay, sand and straw allows for cooking and heating.

The home cost Dunn about $3,000 to build, and the landowner is letting him live rent-free. He said that will help with the high cost of college.

The Henniker, N.H., native said living in the home is the “most raw experience that I’ve ever had.”

CENTENARIANS MARK 75TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY

CATONSVILLE, Md. — Two centenarians are celebrating their 75th wedding anniversary at a Maryland retirement community.

Walter and Leslie Kimmel were married on Aug. 18, 1940. They are both 100 years old.

They celebrated their anniversary Tuesday afternoon at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville, Md., where they live. SugarBakers of Catonsville is providing a personalized cake for the couple.

The Kimmels met at Emmanuel Lutheran Church in Baltimore when they were 22 years old. Leslie played the organ and Walter sang in the choir.

Walter was a longtime employee of Baltimore Gas & Electric. Leslie worked as a secretary. They have two sons, four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

IDAHO REPLACES 420 MILE MARKERS WITH 419.9

BOISE, Idaho — If you’re looking for milepost 420, you won’t find it in Idaho.

Idaho transportation officials said the mile marker has been replaced with 419.9 signs to curb thieves eager to own a number associated with marijuana enthusiasts.

Idaho isn’t alone in this problem. States like Washington and Colorado have also replaced 420 signs with 419.9 after consistently having to replace them after thefts by supposed sticky-fingered stoners.

Adam Rush of the Idaho Transportation Department said officials have replaced the old sign along U.S. Highway 95 with “MILE 419.9,” just south of Coeur d’Alene.

Rush added that this is the only 420 sign the department has replaced. Most highways don’t cover more than 400 miles.

The number “420” has long been associated with marijuana, though its origins as a shorthand for pot are murky.

— Compiled from wire service reports

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