Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Election officials deactivate 205K voter registrations

Election officials deactivate 205K voter registrations

  • Updated
  • Comments
{{featured_button_text}}

Wisconsin elections officials said Wednesday they have removed more than 205,000 voters from the rolls as part of routine work to keep the state's registration lists up to date.

Wisconsin Elections Commission officials said they deactivated 174,307 voter registrations because the voters hadn't cast a ballot in four years and didn't respond to a mailing. They said they are required by law every two years to identify registered voters who haven't voted in the previous four years and deactivate them unless they wish to remain registered.

One of Tyra Buss and Brad Davison's family members films Davison getting down on one knee and proposing to Buss.

The commission also deactivated 31,854 registrations of voters who may have moved and didn't respond to a mailing.

The commission mailed postcards during the summer of 2019 to more than 230,000 voters identified by the Electronic Registration Information Center as having possibly moved.

The commission voted that summer not to deactivate them until after the 2021 elections to give them several chances to affirm they hadn't moved. That stance prompted a lawsuit from the conservative law firm Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty demanding the commission remove those voters within 30 days if they didn't respond to the mailing. The state Supreme Court ultimately ruled that the commission wasn't required to remove voters within that window.

Looking back a decade later, 10 stories about Act 10

The most seismic political story of the last decade in Wisconsin began on Feb. 7, 2011, when Republican Gov. Scott Walker informed a gathering of cabinet members of plans to unilaterally roll back the power of public sector unions in the state. He "dropped the bomb," as Walker would describe it afterward, four days later.

The audacious proposal, to be known forever after as Act 10, required public employees to pay more for pension and health insurance benefits, but also banned most subjects of collective bargaining and placed obstacles to maintaining union membership.

The proposal laid bare the state's deep, at times intensely personal, political divisions as tens of thousands of protesters descended on the Capitol. The month-long, round-the-clock occupation drew international attention, but failed to stop the bill.

A decade later, the aftershocks of one of the biggest political earthquakes in Wisconsin history continue to be felt. Taxes have been held in check, and state finances have improved. But public unions are vastly diminished and the state is more politically divided than ever.

Here are 10 stories from people who experienced the historic events firsthand.

2
0
0
0
0

Get Government & Politics updates in your inbox!

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

News Alert