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Humberto and Kiko, Imelda and Jerry, Mario and Lorena, may be dancing with the stars from their lofty perch in the atmosphere, but their impact is anything but entertaining.

These six named storms forming all at once this week in both the Atlantic and Pacific set a record, the Weather Channel reported, causing heavy rains and flooding with more consequences possible.

Meteorologist Eric Blake marveled at the circumstances on Twitter:

The National Weather Service says Imelda is the seventh-wettest tropical cyclone to strike the 48 contiguous United States on record.

Meteorologist Michael Marcotte of the weather service office in Lake Charles, Louisiana, says Imelda is also the fourth-wettest to strike Texas on record. He cited information provided on Thursday by the National Weather Service Weather Prediction Office in College Park, Maryland.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Lorena was upgraded to a hurricane Thursday as it moved just offshore the coast of Colima, Mexico.

Hurricane Jerry is strengthening. Forecasters say the storm is expected to pass just north of the Leeward Islands on Friday, go north of Puerto Rico on Saturday and be east-northeast of the southeastern Bahamas on Sunday.

Also, Hurricane Humberto blew off rooftops, toppled trees and knocked out power as it blew past the British Atlantic island of Bermuda. But officials said Thursday that the Category 3 storm caused no reported deaths.

Here's an explanation of how these storms form, followed by a gallery of photos capturing Imelda's aftermath in Texas:

Ask the Weather Guys: Why do hurricanes form over tropical oceans?
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