WASHINGTON — Here’s a look at how area members of Congress voted over the last two weeks.

House votes

INSIDER TRADING OF STOCKS: The House has passed the Promoting Transparent Standards for Corporate Insiders Act (H.R. 624), sponsored by Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., to require a Securities and Exchange Commission study of possible changes to the regulation of Rule 10b5-1 trading plans that allow employees of publicly traded companies to sell shares without violating insider trading prohibitions. The vote, on Jan. 28, was 413 yeas to 3 nays.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

ONLINE TRAFFICKING EXCHANGES: The House has passed the Fight Illicit Networks and Detect Trafficking Act (H.R. 502), sponsored by Rep. Juan Vargas, D-Calif., to require a study by the U.S. Comptroller General of the use of virtual currencies and online marketplaces for trading and financing of goods and services related to sex trafficking and drug trafficking. The vote, on Jan. 28, was 412 yeas to 3 nays.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

VIRTUAL CURRENCIES AND TERRORISM: The House has passed the Homeland Security Assessment of Terrorists’ Use of Virtual Currencies Act (H.R. 428), sponsored by Rep. Kathleen M. Rice, D-N.Y., to require the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Intelligence and Analysis to publish a threat assessment of the use of virtual currencies by terrorists. The vote, on Jan. 29, was 422 yeas to 3 nays.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

HOMELAND SECURITY AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT: The House has passed the Pathways to Improving Homeland Security at the Local Level Act (H.R. 449), sponsored by Rep. Val Butler Demings, D-Fla., to require the Homeland Security Department to annually distribute a catalog describing the agency’s training, publications, programs, and services for state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies. The vote, on Jan. 29, was 412 yeas to 12 nays.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

COUNTERTERRORISM ADVISORY BOARD: The House has passed the Counterterrorism Advisory Board Act (H.R. 769), sponsored by Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y., to establish an advisory board at the Homeland Security Department for coordinating and integrating the agency’s counterterrorism intelligence, activities, and policies. The vote, on Jan. 29, was 414 yeas to 12 nays.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

CONSUMER CREDIT AND GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: The House has passed a motion to table a motion to reconsider a bill (H. Res. 77), sponsored by Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., to express the sense of Congress that consumers facing short-term financial hardship and potential long-term damage to their creditworthiness due to the partial government shutdown should get relief from their banks and other financial companies. Waters said the bill sought to “send a strong message to the financial industry that they should do what they can to help these innocent consumers.” An opponent of the motion to table, Rep. Andy Harris, R-Md., said the bill had an excessively broad definition of the class of consumers affected by the shutdown. The vote, on Jan. 29, was 240 yeas to 176 nays. The House then passed the bill by voice vote.

NAYS: Steil R-WI (1st)

PAY HIKE FOR GOVERNMENT WORKERS: The House has passed the Federal Civilian Workforce Pay Raise Fairness Act (H.R. 790), sponsored by Rep. Gerald E. Connolly, D-Va., to increase 2019 pay for most civilian workers in the federal government by 2.6 percent. Connolly called the bill a statement “that we do respect the work of our civil servants and our federal employees and that we are prepared to provide concrete measures to do that.” An opponent, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said government workers already received higher pay than their peers in the private sector, and the 2.6 percent raise would increase the burden on those private sector workers. The vote, on Jan. 30, was 259 yeas to 161 nays.

NAYS: Steil R-WI (1st)

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWNS: The House has rejected a resolution (H. Res. 79), sponsored by Rep. Jennifer Wexton, D-Va., that would have expressed the sense of the House that government shutdowns harm the U.S. and are not an acceptable method for resolving differences within Congress and/or the presidency. Wexton said: “We owe assurances to the millions of federal civilian workers, including the hundreds of thousands who were furloughed earlier this month, that Congress will ensure continued, uninterrupted operations of the federal government.” The vote, on Jan. 30, was 249 yeas to 163 nays, with a two-thirds majority required for approval.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

NAMING SCENIC BYWAYS: The House has passed the Reviving Americas Scenic Byways Act (H.R. 831), sponsored by Rep. David N. Cicillini, D-R.I., to require the Transportation Department to consider nominations for roads that could be designated as national scenic byways. Cicillini said adding roads to the scenic byways program should work to promote international tourists coming to the U.S., and create tourism-related jobs. The vote, on Feb. 6, was 404 yeas to 19 nays.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

ROUTE 66 CENTENNIAL: The House has passed the Route 66 Centennial Commission Act (H.R. 66), sponsored by Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill. The bill would establish the Route 66 Centennial Commission, to be charged with planning programs for celebrating the highway’s centennial in 2026. Davis cited the historical and ongoing economic significance of Route 66 as the nation’s first paved highway, and said the commission would help “give this route what it deserves in our nation’s history.” The vote, on Feb. 6, was 399 yeas to 22 nays.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

STEALING VETERANS BENEFITS: The House has passed the Preventing Crimes Against Veterans Act (H.R. 450), sponsored by Rep. Theodore E. Deutch, D-Fla., to establish a fine and imprisonment of up to 5 years as penalties for those who attempt to defraud military veterans of their veterans’ benefits. Deutch said the penalties “will close a loophole in our criminal law and will give federal law enforcement the tools they need to crack down on financial fraud schemes that target our veterans.” The vote, on Feb. 7, was unanimous with 417 yeas.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

HUMAN TRAFFICKING: The House has passed the Put Trafficking Victims First Act (H.R. 507), sponsored by Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., to establish a working group at the Justice Department charged with recommending ways to increase the gathering of information about sex and labor trafficking in order to combat such activity. Bass said the working group would help Congress have the information it needs to better combat human trafficking and provide information resources to law enforcement and other parties seeking to stop traffickers. The vote, on Feb. 7, was 414 yeas to 1 nay.

YEAS: Steil R-WI (1st)

The House also passed the Further Additional Continuing Appropriations Act (H.J. Res. 28), making further continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2019; the Department of Homeland Security Clearance Management and Administration Act (H.R. 424), to improve the management and administration of the security clearance processes throughout the Department of Homeland Security; the Federal Information Resource to Strengthen Ties with State and Local Law Enforcement Act (H.R. 495), to require an annual report on the Office for State and Local Law Enforcement; and passed a motion to go to conference with the Senate for a bill (H.J. Res. 31), making further continuing appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for fiscal year 2019.

The House also passed the Pacific Northwest Earthquake Preparedness Act (H.R. 876), to direct the Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency to carry out a plan for the purchase and installation of an earthquake early warning system for the Cascadia Subduction Zone; the Fairness For Breastfeeding Mothers Act (H.R. 866), to provide a lactation room in public buildings; a bill (H.R. 543), to require the Federal Railroad Administration to provide appropriate congressional notice of comprehensive safety assessments conducted with respect to intercity or commuter rail passenger transportation; and the Open Book on Equal Access to Justice Act (H.R. 752), to require the maintenance of databases on awards of fees and other expenses to prevailing parties in certain administrative proceedings and court cases to which the United States is a party.

Senate votes

TROOPS IN SYRIA AND AFGHANISTAN: The Senate has passed a cloture motion to end debate on an amendment sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to the Strengthening America’s Security in the Middle East Act (S. 1). The amendment would express the sense of the Senate cautioning that a rapid withdrawal of U.S. troops from either Syria or Afghanistan could put at risk hard-won gains against terrorist groups and U.S. national security improvements achieved in the two countries. McConnell said it sought to put the Senate “on the record about what our country should be doing in Syria and Afghanistan” at a time of debate over the extent to which the U.S. should intervene there. An opponent, Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., questioned whether the U.S. mission in Syria and Afghanistan was turning from protecting national security to the difficult and costly goal of nation-building. The vote to end debate, on Jan. 31, was 68 yeas to 23 nays.

YEAS: Johnson R-WI

NAYS: Baldwin D-WI

CONFLICTS IN SYRIA AND AFGHANISTAN: The Senate has passed an amendment sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to the Strengthening America’s Security in the Middle East Act (S. 1). The amendment expressed the sense of the Senate that a rapid withdrawal of U.S. soldiers from Syria or Afghanistan could put at risk hard-won gains and endanger national security. McConnell said of the need for continued deployments to the two countries: “ISIS and al-Qaida have yet to be defeated, and American national security interests require continued commitment to our missions there.” The vote, on Feb. 4, was 70 yeas to 26 nays.

YEAS: Johnson R-WI

NAYS: Baldwin D-WI

MIDDLE EAST SECURITY: The Senate has passed the Strengthening America’s Security in the Middle East Act (S. 1), sponsored by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. The bill would authorize assistance and weapons transfers to Israel, extend a military partnership agreement with Jordan, impose sanctions on Syria’s government, and take measures to protect U.S. government bodies that oppose the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel from lawsuits stemming from that opposition. The vote, on Feb. 5, was 77 yeas to 23 nays.

YEAS: Johnson R-WI

NAYS: Baldwin D-WI

CARING FOR FEDERAL LANDS: The Senate has tabled an amendment sponsored by Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., to the Natural Resources Management Act (S. 47). The amendment would have changed the Land and Water Conservation Fund to require that maintenance needs for new lands obtained by the fund be accounted for at the time of purchase, and allocated 5 percent of the fund to be used for work on the deferred maintenance backlog at the national parks. The vote to table, on Feb. 7, was 66 yeas to 33 nays.

NAYS: Johnson R-WI

YEAS: Baldwin D-WI

Along with roll call votes, the Senate also passed the Further Additional Continuing Appropriations Act (H.J. Res. 28), making further continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2019; and a bill (H.J. Res. 31), making further continuing appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for fiscal year 2019.

The Senate also passed a bill (H. Con. Res. 9), providing for a joint session of Congress to receive a message from the President.

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